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The paintings and artefacts belonging to the University of Oxford and its colleges comprise one of the finest university collections in the world. These are spread across five museums, the Bodleian Libraries, various academic departments, and over 40 Colleges. The paintings in the Colleges consist chiefly of portraits, collected over four centuries, although they also include a number of Old Masters. The Christ Church Picture Gallery, founded in 1765, contains one of the most important groups of Old Master paintings and drawings in the country. The Ashmolean is the chief museum of art within the university. Their collection can be found on Your Paintings under 'The Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology' under the county of Oxfordshire. Founded in 1683 as the country's first public museum, it merged with the university art collections in 1908 and now has over 1,200 paintings, covering most schools of European art. The outstanding character of the collection has depended heavily on gifts. Several of the Ashmolean's finest paintings, including Paolo Uccello's 'The Hunt in the Forest' and Claude Lorrain's 'Landscape with Ascanius shooting the Stag of Sylvia', have been donated or bequeathed although a number of other major works, particularly in recent years, have been purchased with generous support from the National Lottery, the Art Fund and many individuals. The transformation of the museum, following the opening of the new building in 2009, has provided significant new space, particularly for the twentieth-century paintings which now complete a sequence of paintings from the fourteenth century to the present.