The artistic movement of Shona Sculpture only emerged in the mid 1900's, largely due to the English artist Frank McEwen who was responsible for nurturing, promoting and showcasing the art form. Shona is the name of a multi-clan group of people who constitute the largest ethnic community in Zimbabwe, Africa. The modern movement has its roots in the early stone carvings of the Shona people, produced more for functional and decorative purposes, in the construction of dwellings. The best example of which is the Great Zimbabwe Settlement, an 11th -15th century city of sixty acres, housing up to 18,000 people, at its height.

6 artworks
Shona Sculpture
© the copyright holder. Image credit: Watford Museum

Shona Sculpture

Cloud Mapete (b.1961)

Stone

H 18 x W 7 x D 5 cm

Watford Museum

Shona Sculpture of a Face
© the copyright holder. Image credit: Watford Museum

Shona Sculpture of a Face

Gift Muza (d.1996)

Stone

H 18 x W 6.5 x D 6 cm

Watford Museum

Shona Sculpture with Two Smiling Faces
© the copyright holder. Image credit: Watford Museum

Shona Sculpture with Two Smiling Faces

Phineas Kamangira

Stone

H 19 x W 4 x D 5 cm

Watford Museum

Shona Sculpture of a Mother and Her Two Children
© the copyright holder. Image credit: Watford Museum

Shona Sculpture of a Mother and Her Two Children

unknown artist

Stone

H 23 x W 12 x D 10 cm

Watford Museum

Abstract Shona Sculpture with a Figure with a Vase
© the copyright holder. Image credit: Watford Museum

Abstract Shona Sculpture with a Figure with a Vase

unknown artist

Stone

H 30 x W 8 x D 4.5 cm

Watford Museum

Fortune Teller
© the copyright holder. Image credit: Kirklees Museums and Galleries

Fortune Teller 1994

Phineas Kamangira

Stone

Kirklees Museums and Galleries