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A miscellany of hops, hop-picking and oasthouses from the public art collections in the UK.

42 artworks
  • Hop-picking scene (unidentified location)

    This scene may show the farmer's own family picking hops on their smallholding, rather than the seasonal workers usually depicted in paintings of later periods. Mid 18th century.
    NB - A near-copy of the original held by the Yale Center for British Art.

    Hop-Picking
    George Smith (1714–1776) (after)
    Oil on canvas
    H 44 x W 59 cm
    Maidstone Museum & Bentlif Art Gallery
    Hop-Picking
    Photo credit: Bridgeman Images

  • Hop-picking scene (fantasy)

    Hop-picking in the days before health and safety legislation... 1790s.

    Putti Picking Hops 1794–1797
    Julius Caesar Ibbetson (1759–1817)
    Oil on paper
    H 36.8 x W 41.9 cm
    English Heritage, Kenwood

  • Hop-picking scene (unidentified location)

    A romanticised view of a hop picking family, looking like they are getting ready for a Sunday outing rather than a day's hard work. Mid 19th century?

    The Hop Pickers
    Henry William Pickersgill (1782–1875)
    Oil on canvas
    H 43.6 x W 35.6 cm
    Glynn Vivian Art Gallery
    The Hop Pickers
    Photo credit: City & County of Swansea: Glynn Vivian Art Gallery Collection

  • Hop-picking scene (unidentified location)

    Manchester Art Gallery description:
    "A hop picking scene, looking down a steep hillside and across the valley below, which trails off into the distance. In the foreground, on the slope of the hill, men and women pick hops, overseen by a man on a black horse to the right. There is a small cottage to the left amongst the unpicked hop bushes, with a copse of shadowy trees behind it. More hop pickers are working lower down the hill, in the background to right. There is a dramatic clouded sky overhead."

    Hop Garden 1852
    John William Buxton Knight (1842/1843–1908)
    Oil on canvas
    H 88.6 x W 124 cm
    Manchester Art Gallery
    Hop Garden
    Photo credit: Manchester Art Gallery

  • Hop-picking scene (unidentified location)

    A romanticised view of a large family of hop pickers working in a hop garden, with different generations undertaking the various tasks involved: taking down the poles, stripping the bines and plucking the cones into the bin before the next visit by the tally-man.

    Hop Garden 1858
    Thomas George Webster (1800–1886)
    Oil on board
    H 22.9 x W 41 cm
    Shipley Art Gallery
    Hop Garden
    Photo credit: Shipley Art Gallery

  • Hop-picking scene (unidentified location)

    A bucolic scene purporting to show life in the hop garden, although the harvest-ready bines on the poles and a distant oasthouse seem more realistic.

    Life in the Hop Garden 1859
    Phoebus Levin (1836–1908)
    Oil on canvas
    H 64.8 x W 112 cm
    Towneley Hall Art Gallery & Museum
    Life in the Hop Garden
    Photo credit: Towneley Hall Art Gallery & Museum

  • Hop-picking scene, Maidstone, Kent

    Hop picking appears to be underway in the garden (probably belonging to the former College of All Saints) shown in the lower left quarter of this view across the River Medway. Mid 19th century?

    Maidstone, Kent, from the College Hop Garden 1860
    James John Gegan (1821–1899)
    Oil on canvas
    H 115 x W 190 cm
    Maidstone Museum & Bentlif Art Gallery
    Maidstone, Kent, from the College Hop Garden
    Photo credit: Maidstone Museum & Bentlif Art Gallery

  • Hop-picking scene (unidentified location)

    A continental hop-picking scene, with the cones being plucked from the bines indoors rather than out in the hop garden as done for centuries in England until invention of the hop picking machine. Later 19th century?

    Hop Picking
    Rudolf Hirth du Frênes (1846–1916)
    Oil on wood
    H 60 x W 70 cm
    Atkinson Art Gallery Collection
    Hop Picking
    Photo credit: Atkinson Art Gallery Collection

  • Hop-picking scene, Hastings, East Sussex

    Hop picking underway at Alexandra Park on the northern outskirts of Hastings, mostly by women wearing a variety of bonnets and hats, with a couple of men taking down poles in the background and a tally-man standing by the bin ready to measure the harvest.

    Hop Garden in Alexandra Park, East Sussex c.1872
    Charles A. Graves (1834/1835–1918)
    Oil on canvas
    H 35.5 x W 53 cm
    Hastings Museum and Art Gallery
    Hop Garden in Alexandra Park, East Sussex
    Photo credit: Hastings Museum and Art Gallery

  • Oasthouses and hop gardens, Wrotham, Kent

    From Tate description:
    "The Hop-Gardens of England is a large canvas, painted during the summer and autumn of 1874 on location in Wrotham in Kent, where the artist used a barn as a studio. It shows a rolling landscape with rows of burgeoning hops dwarfing a pilgrim-like figure in the foreground. A plough sits on a hill in the foreground, while oast houses and other farm buildings are detailed in the background."
    Image available at: https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/lawson-the-hop-gardens-of-england-t13443

    The Hop-Gardens of England 1874
    Cecil Gordon Lawson (1849–1882)
    Oil on canvas
    H 153.7 x W 213.4 cm
    Tate

  • Hop-picking scene (unidentified location)

    The reality of a day's hard work in the hop garden is shown here, unlike the mostly romanticised views of this period.

    Hop Pickers Returning 1883
    Alexander Mann (1853–1908)
    Oil on canvas
    H 117.1 x W 96.7 cm
    Hunterian Art Gallery, University of Glasgow
    Hop Pickers Returning
    Photo credit: The Hunterian, University of Glasgow

  • Hop-picking scene (unidentified location)

    A romanticised view of hop pickers taking a midday meal in a small hop garden, with the bines being stripped from the poles ready for plucking of the cones into the bin or crib (with the name depending on region), prior to being taken to the oast for drying.

    Nooning in the Hop Gardens 1889
    David Murray (1849–1933)
    Oil on canvas
    H 122.2 x W 183.2 cm
    Laing Art Gallery
    Nooning in the Hop Gardens
    Photo credit: Laing Art Gallery

  • Hop garden (unidentified location)

    This appears to be a post-harvest scene in the days when hops were still grown up individual small poles which were then taken down over the winter before being re-erected in the following spring (rather than growing up strings supported by permanent wirework and larger poles). Late 19th century?

    Hop Garden
    Benjamin Haughton (1865–1924)
    Oil on board
    H 30 x W 39 cm
    Portsmouth Museums and Visitor Services
    Hop Garden
    Photo credit: Portsmouth Museums and Visitor Services

  • Oasthouse (unidentified location)

    An unusual view of the internal workings of an oasthouse, with the workmen bagging dried hops into hessian sacks (a practice soon to be replaced by hop presses used to compress the contents into longer 'pockets' for ease of transport and storage).

    Workers: Workmen Bagging Hops 1904
    Harold Oakley (active 1904–1929)
    Oil on canvas
    H 91.5 x W 122 cm
    UCL Culture
    Workers: Workmen Bagging Hops
    © the copyright holder. Photo credit: UCL Culture

  • Hop-picking scene (unidentified location)

    Most hop pickers would have stayed in tents or rough shacks for a few weeks each September, but these itinerant workers have their own mobile accommodation and no doubt a few more home comforts.

    Gypsy Life – The Hop Pickers 1913
    Alfred James Munnings (1878–1959)
    Oil on canvas
    H 62.2 x W 74.9 cm
    Yale Center for British Art
    Gypsy Life – The Hop Pickers
    © the estate of Sir Alfred Munnings, Dedham, Essex. Photo credit: Yale Center for British Art

  • Oasthouse, Cookham, Berkshire

    A dramatic study of oasthouse cowls under repair.

    Mending Cowls, Cookham 1915
    Stanley Spencer (1891–1959)
    Oil on canvas
    H 109.2 x W 109.2 cm
    Tate

  • Oasthouses, Kent

    A timeless sketch, with just a few simple lines immediately conveying 'oasthouses' to the viewer.

    Oast Houses, Kent 1920
    Frank Short (1857–1945)
    Etching on paper
    H 17 x W 24.5 cm
    Rye Art Gallery
    Oast Houses, Kent
    Photo credit: Rye Art Gallery

  • Oasthouses, Menston, Yorkshire

    This doesn't look like a Yorkshire scene, and is thus highly unusual since hops were very rarely grown this far north (although there was a small hop cooperative in Brough for a few years). Early 20th century?

    Oasthouses, Menston, Yorkshire
    John Albert Cooper (1894–1943)
    Oil on canvas
    H 50.5 x W 60.7 cm
    Leeds Museums and Galleries
    Oasthouses, Menston, Yorkshire
    Photo credit: Leeds Museums and Galleries

  • Oasthouse, Kent

    A typical Kentish scene, probably in the High Weald, in which at least one oasthouse can be seen in the distance. Early 20th century?

    Kentish Landscape
    Benjamin Haughton (1865–1924)
    Oil on board
    H 31.5 x W 40.2 cm
    Portsmouth Museums and Visitor Services
    Kentish Landscape
    Photo credit: Portsmouth Museums and Visitor Services

  • Oasthouse, Kent

    A curious piece of railway company artwork, with the couple's attention divided between train and oasthouse? Early 20th century?

    South Eastern Railway Train in Kent Countryside Hauled by 4–2–0 Locomotives Nos.85 and 136
    Cuthbert Hamilton Ellis (1909–1987)
    Oil on board
    H 38.9 x W 61 cm
    National Railway Museum

  • Hop-picking scene (unidentified location)

    Apart from the bines growing up strings supported by wirework rather than individual poles, this hop-picking scene otherwise looks little changed from the 19th-century farming practice. Earlier 20th century?

    Hop-Picking
    Alfred James Munnings (1878–1959)
    Oil on canvas
    H 92.1 x W 102.2 cm
    Museums Sheffield
    Hop-Picking
    © the estate of Sir Alfred Munnings, Dedham, Essex. Photo credit: Museums Sheffield

  • Hop-picking scene (unidentified location)

    In a modern style, yet fully reflective of the more romanticised scenes of hop picking prevalent for decades, with a oasthouse visible beyond the hop garden.

    The Hop-Pickers c.1930
    Thomas Saunders Nash (1891–1968)
    Oil on canvas
    H 58.7 x W 88.9 cm
    The Mercer Art Gallery, Harrogate
    The Hop-Pickers
    © the artist's estate. Photo credit: The Mercer Art Gallery, Harrogate

  • Hop-picking scene (unidentified location)

    It is not clear in this scene whether the hops are grown using traditional poles or the newer method of strings supported by wirework, and these hop pickers are still plucking cones from bines and filling old-fashioned baskets before being transferred to larger bins for measurement purposes. 1930s?

    The Day's Work, Hop-Picking
    Thérèse Lessore (1884–1945)
    Oil on canvas
    H 76.7 x W 53.5 cm
    Aberdeen Art Gallery & Museums
    The Day's Work, Hop-Picking
    Photo credit: Aberdeen Art Gallery & Museums

  • Hop-picking scene (unidentified location)

    A timeless scene, with a mother plucking hop cones into baskets and a baby pulling leaves from the remaining bines. 1930s?

    Hop-Pickers
    Thérèse Lessore (1884–1945)
    Oil on canvas
    H 49.5 x W 59.7 cm
    The Stanley & Audrey Burton Gallery, University of Leeds
    Hop-Pickers
    Photo credit: The Stanley & Audrey Burton Gallery, University of Leeds

  • Hop-picking scene, Kent

    Although the wirework cannot be seen, these hop pickers are plucking cones from bines on a string that is still partly hung from the trellis and filling pokes (jute bags) to be taken to the oast.

    Hop Gardens, Kent 1935
    Thérèse Lessore (1884–1945)
    Oil on canvas
    H 61 x W 50.5 cm
    Rochdale Arts & Heritage Service
    Hop Gardens, Kent
    Photo credit: Rochdale Arts & Heritage Service

  • Hop-picking scene (unidentified location)

    These hop pickers are plucking cones into baskets for measuring from cut bines piled up behind them, with filled pokes in the background ready to be taken to the oast.

    Hop-Pickers c.1938
    Thérèse Lessore (1884–1945)
    Oil on canvas
    H 65.5 x W 76 cm
    The Collection: Art & Archaeology in Lincolnshire (Usher Gallery)
    Hop-Pickers
    Photo credit: The Collection: Art & Archaeology in Lincolnshire (Usher Gallery)

  • Hop-picking scene (unidentified location)

    A characterful study, reflecting the era of multi-generational families going 'hopping' every September as a working holiday to earn some much-needed extra money.

    Hop-Picking – Granny Knowles c.1938
    Laura Knight (1877–1970)
    Oil on canvas
    H 64 x W 51 cm
    Canterbury Museums and Galleries

  • Hop-picking scene (unidentified location)

    With the era of large family groups going hop picking every September almost over, this scene appears to show regular farm workers stripping bines from the strings and plucking the cones into pokes for transport to the oasthouse.

    The Hop Pickers 1945
    John Minton (1917–1957)
    Watercolour, pen, gouache & chalk on paper
    H 26 x W 33.5 cm
    The Ingram Collection of Modern British and Contemporary Art
    The Hop Pickers
    © Royal College of Art / Bridgeman Images. Photo credit: The Ingram Collection of Modern British and Contemporary Art

  • Hop-picking scene (unidentified location)

    Wistfulness? Melancholy? This post-war scene reflects the ending of the era of large family groups going hop picking every September.

    Hop-Picking No. 1 c.1946
    Laura Knight (1877–1970)
    Oil on canvas
    H 76.3 x W 63.6 cm
    Canterbury Museums and Galleries

  • Hop-picking scene, Rye, East Sussex

    This scene looks very traditional, with large family groups plucking cones into bins for measurements before being transferred to pokes for transport to the oasthouse. The first bines also appear to be still grown up individual poles but the hop garden in the background looks more modern with permanent poles and wirework?

    Hop-Picking, Rye 1950
    Keith Baynes (1887–1977)
    Oil on canvas
    H 114.3 x W 152.4 cm
    The Higgins Bedford
    Hop-Picking, Rye
    © the artist's estate. Photo credit: The Higgins Bedford

  • Oasthouse, Steyning, West Sussex

    An unidentified converted oasthouse, probably somewhere on or close to the River Adur floodplain, with two roundels missing their white cowls. Mid 20th century?

    A Sussex Landscape near Steyning
    Garnet Ruskin Wolseley (1884–1967)
    Oil on board
    H 18 x W 23 cm
    Bushey Museum and Art Gallery
    A Sussex Landscape near Steyning
    © the copyright holder. Photo credit: Bushey Museum and Art Gallery

  • Hop garden (unidentified location)

    A scene showing the geometry of a hop garden part-way through the growing season, before the wirework and strings supporting the bines become fully hidden by vegetation.

    The Hop Garden 1950
    William Townsend (1909–1973)
    Oil on canvas
    H 63.5 x W 76.2 cm
    Arts Council Collection, Southbank Centre
    The Hop Garden
    © the artist's estate. Photo credit: Arts Council Collection, Southbank Centre, London

  • Hop garden, Kent

    A hop garden in the rolling Kent countryside shown part-way through the growing season, before the wirework and strings supporting the bines become fully hidden by vegetation.

    Hop Garden in Kent 1952
    William Townsend (1909–1973)
    Oil on canvas
    H 92.7 x W 76.2 cm
    UCL Culture
    Hop Garden in Kent
    © the artist's estate. Photo credit: UCL Culture

  • Oasthouse and hop garden, Kent

    A typically idealised view of Kent as the 'Garden of England' used for railway company publicity artwork.

    Kent: The Garden of England 1955
    Frank Sherwin (1896–1986)
    Oil on canvas
    H 81.3 x W 127 cm
    National Railway Museum

  • Tarrington Court Oast, Tarrington, Herefordshire

    An oasthouse with two square kilns in the village of Tarrington, located halfway between Hereford and Ledbury, shown before conversion to residential use.

    Tarrington Court, Herefordshire 1961
    Gilbert Spencer (1892–1979)
    Oil on canvas
    H 63.5 x W 89 cm
    Hereford Museum and Art Gallery
    Tarrington Court, Herefordshire
    © estate of Gilbert Spencer. All rights reserved, DACS 2021. Photo credit: Hereford Museum and Art Gallery

  • Oasthouse (unidentified location)

    From the Royal Academy of Music description:
    "This picture shows two red oast houses on the left, with distinctive roofs. In the foreground, a single workman dressed in blue is shown in profile, holding a tool and bent over a pile of unidentified material, perhaps wood or metal." Mid 20th century (pre-1968)?

    Oast Houses with Peasant in Blue
    Josef Herman (1911–2000)
    Oil on canvas
    H 25.5 x W 30 cm
    Royal Academy of Music
    Oast Houses with Peasant in Blue
    © estate of Josef Herman. All rights reserved, DACS 2021. Photo credit: Royal Academy of Music

  • Hop-picking scene (unidentified location)

    Although the hop garden in the background could have been painted in the early 20th century, these workers on a trailer are loading cut bines onto the conveyor leading into the shed housing a modern hop picking machine, and a tractor is in use to collect the next load.

    Hop-Pickers c.1969
    Janet B. McCulloch (1909–2004)
    Oil on canvas
    H 50.5 x W 60.5 cm
    The Amelia
    Hop-Pickers
    © the artist's estate. Photo credit: Tunbridge Wells Borough Council t/a The Amelia

  • Hop-picking scene, Farnham, Surrey

    Apart from the bines growing up strings supported by wirework rather than individual poles, this traditional hop-picking scene otherwise looks little changed from the 19th-century farming practice.

    The Last Hop-Picking in the Chantries, Farnham, Surrey c.1970
    Clara Joan Murphy (1900–1986)
    Oil on canvas
    H 61.5 x W 74.5 cm
    Museum of Farnham
    The Last Hop-Picking in the Chantries, Farnham, Surrey
    © the artist's estate. Photo credit: Museum of Farnham

  • Oasthouse, Kent

    A stylised view of an oasthouse and other buildings in a small farmstead in the rolling Kent countryside, no doubt all converted to residential use today...

    The Oasthouse, Kent 1978
    Ernest Greenwood (1913–2009)
    Watercolour & white heightening on paper
    H 42.5 x W 55.5 cm
    The Foundation for Essex Arts: BAT Collection
    The Oasthouse, Kent
    © the artist's estate. Photo credit: The Foundation for Essex Arts: BAT Collection

  • Oasthouse, Farnham, Surrey

    A rather bleak view of an unconverted three-roundel oast, set (as was often the case) beside a pond or stream to provide a ready source of water in case of a conflagration in one of the kilns... Later 20th century?

    Landscape with Oasthouses
    Sidney Reeves (b.c.1925)
    Oil on hardboard
    H 29 x W 40.5 cm
    Museum of Farnham
    Landscape with Oasthouses
    © the copyright holder. Photo credit: Museum of Farnham

  • Oasthouse, Kent

    A classic Kent landscape, with the white specks of two cowls on a distant oasthouse immediately obvious despite their modest size (and to the right of the trees, another three-kiln oast can just be seen in the far distance).

    A Kent Landscape 1993
    David Shepherd (1931–2017)
    Oil on canvas
    H 51 x W 91 cm
    Maidstone Museum & Bentlif Art Gallery
    A Kent Landscape
    © the artist's estate. Photo credit: Maidstone Museum & Bentlif Art Gallery

  • Hop kiln and hop yard, Bromyard, Herefordshire

    A stylised hop kiln and hop yard (the West Midlands terms for oasthouse and hop garden), shown on one of 17 panels in the Bromyard Centre depicting the history of the area.

    The Bromyard Frieze
    David Jones (b.1945)
    Acrylic, ink & mixed media on wood panel
    H 1 x W 2.9 cm
    The Bromyard Centre
    The Bromyard Frieze
    © the artist. Photo credit: The Bromyard Centre