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The Fairy Feller's Master-Stroke

Photo credit: Tate

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Notes

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This work, although unfinished, is generally considered to be Dadd's masterpiece. It was painted for H. G. Haydon, an official at Bethlem Hospital, where Dadd was sent after he became insane and murdered his father in 1843. He was transferred to Broadmoor in July 1864, before being able to complete the painting, but he later wrote a long and rambling poem entitled 'Elimination of a Picture & its subject - called The Feller's Master Stroke', which attempts to explain some of the imagery.

Tate

Art UK Founder Partner

More information

Date

1855–64

Medium

Oil on canvas

Measurements

H 54 x W 39.4 cm

Accession number

T00598

Acquisition method

Presented by Siegfried Sassoon in memory of his friend and fellow officer Julian Dadd, a great-nephew of the artist, and of his two brothers who gave their lives in the First World War 1963

Work type

Painting

Inscription description

date inscribed


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