Note: Your tags will not be submitted until you login Create account?
Exit

What things, ideas or objects can you see in this artwork?

i

Things are objects or ideas portrayed in the artwork. For example: apple, dog, smile, celebration, etc.

What do we mean by ‘things’?
Can you find what you’re tagging from this list? If so, please select it.
There are records to display, please narrow your criteria
Add as many tags as you want Need help?

Things you’ve added

You can click a tag below to remove it.

Things added by others

Can you name any people depicted in this artwork?

i

People are the names of figures depicted in the artwork. For example: Queen Victoria, Charles Darwin, Florence Nightingale, etc.

What do we mean by ‘people’?
Can you find what you’re tagging from this list? If so, please select it.
There are records to display, please narrow your criteria
Add as many tags as you want Need help?

People you’ve added

You can click a tag below to remove it.

People added by others

Can you name any places depicted in this artwork?

i

Places are geographical locations and venues depicted in the artwork. For example: Glasgow, London Bridge, Belgium, etc.

What do we mean by ‘places’?
Can you find what you’re tagging from this list? If so, please select it.
There are records to display, please narrow your criteria
Add as many tags as you want Need help?

Places you’ve added

You can click a tag below to remove it.

Places added by others

Can you name any events depicted in this artwork?

i

Events are occasions or historical moments shown in the artwork. For Example: WW1, Diamond Jubilee, Birthday Party, Battle of Hastings, etc.

What do we mean by ‘events’?
Can you find what you’re tagging from this list? If so, please select it.
There are records to display, please narrow your criteria
Add as many tags as you want Need help?

Events you’ve added

You can click a tag below to remove it.

Events added by others

How you can use this image

This image has been made available under a Creative Commons Zero licence (CC0). This means it can be used in any way, for commercial or non-commercial purposes.

Please acknowledge the collection who own the work with a photo credit — this helps spread the word about their resources.

To learn more about image reuse and Creative Commons, please see our image use page.

Download

Notes

Add or edit a note on this artwork that only you can see. You can find notes again by going to the ‘Notes’ section of your account.

London’s suburbs spread rapidly from 1850 on, with Londoners keen to escape the city for the pretence of something closer to nature. One such middle-class neighbourhood was Haverstock Hill in South Hampstead, where the painter George Clausen rented a studio at a time when he was recording scenes of modern life in a manner inspired by the latest French painting. Here, a line of schoolgirls proceeds up the street, chaperoned by their schoolmistress. The apparent naturalness of the schoolgirls, and the unusual cropping of their figures, prompted a critic in the Times (London) to declare approvingly that 'the whole composition seems so spontaneous and unforced.' Yet Clausen subtly probes at Victorian proprieties. There is a hint of sexual frisson in the schoolgirls’ direct gazes, as well as lurking class conflict: the wealthy girls pointedly ignore the poor flower seller, while the aging milkmaid stares at them from the road with a look of undisguised contempt.

Title

Schoolgirls

Date

1880

Medium

oil on canvas

Measurements

H 52.1 x W 77.2 cm

Accession number

B1985.10.1

Acquisition method

Paul Mellon Collection

Work type

Painting

Signature/marks description

signed and dated, lower left: .G. Clausen. 1880.

Tags

This artwork does not have any tags yet. You can help by tagging artworks on Tagger.

Yale Center for British Art

1080 Chapel Street, New Haven, Connecticut 06510-2302, USA,

This venue is closed to the public.
View venue